Creative COW SIGN IN :: SPONSORS :: ADVERTISING :: ABOUT US :: CONTACT US :: FAQ
Creative COW's LinkedIn GroupCreative COW's Facebook PageCreative COW on TwitterCreative COW's Google+ PageCreative COW on YouTube
COW NEWSLETTER:Recent NewslettersSubscribe or Unsubscribe



"I'm the online editor for Suits since the pilot and Covert since Season 2," says Scott Freeman. "What makes it a fascinating position is that it's 100 percent file-based, which provided me with a fun dilemma to solve. I first heard about Blackmagic Design through their 10-bit codec, which offered uncompressed SD at a smaller file size and became a huge fan. I'm also a die-hard Avid fan. I love Avid and its metadata has always been a great treat for me.

"When Blackmagic Design released Resolve, I realized how I could use it to solve my dilemma. Some people might think it's strange for an online editor to use Resolve, but it does much more than color correction so I decided to use it to pull my shots. I had been looking for this solution for a long time. What took me five days now takes me 11 minutes. I dove into using Resolve v.7 in March 2011 on Suits and Covert Affairs and haven't looked back."

Take a look at how Scott Freeman rountrips between Blackmagic's DaVinci Resolve and Avid.


Take a look Behind the Lens of The Lone Ranger with Bojan Bazelli

Behind the Lens: The Lone Ranger's Bojan Bazelli

Behind the Lens: The Lone Ranger's Bojan Bazelli

Bojan Bazelli, ASC, working with Director Gore Verbinski, designed and executed a unique look for The Lone Ranger. With a nod to the much-filmed Western genre, they made a uniquely contemporary film with a much more desaturated color palette and a grittier look to the classic locations.


And for a deeper look into the workflow for The Lone Ranger, read A Contemporary Style for a Classic Genre

Behind the Lens: The Lone Ranger's Bojan Bazelli

The Lone Ranger: A Contemporary Style for a Classic Genre

When cinematographer Bojan Bazelli, ASC decided to shoot The Lone Ranger with 35mm film, he also realized that some of the scenes might best be served with a digital camera. Choosing the ARRI Alexa Studio for the film's anamorphic look and Codex recorders, Bazelli was able to create a filmic look in digital that seamlessly integrated with the 35mm footage.
Subscribe or Unsubscribe



World War Z depicts a world overrun by ravenous, fast-moving zombies. Shooting this cataclysmic environment was no walk in the park; the production went to numerous challenging locations including Malta (in the middle of a sweltering summer), the West coast of England and Ireland where all the ocean sequences were filmed, an abandoned water treatment facility on the East coast of England, a city building in Glasgow, Scotland that doubled for Philadelphia City Hall, and Budapest.

When World War Z producers knew they would be taking the production to a variety of tough locations, Unit Production Manager Colin Wilson knew who to call for help with video assist, camera and VFX support: Video Hawks Founder/President Tom Loewy, Principal Dan Moore and Technoprops Founder/President Glenn Derry. The trio had worked together on a variety of tough assignments, including making virtual cinematography a reality for director James Cameron during the shooting of Avatar.

Read about how the team created an advanced system for everything from video assist to capturing lens metadata, able to stand up to eight weeks of 14 hour days, in remote locations and extreme conditions around the world in World War Z: Advanced Location Production for the Zombie Apocalypse.


Also, read about using Blackmagic Design's Teranex 2D for Documentary Upconversion

Using a Little Blackmagic to Revisit a Documentary

Using a Little Blackmagic to Revisit a Documentary

Pixie Dust flows from Blackmagic Design's Teranex 2D Processor to integrate and upconvert newly discovered vintage SD footage, photographic stills and new interviews into a re-edited and remastered 2001 documentary memorializing the 1963 NCAA "Game of Change" between Mississippi State University and Loyola. Over 60% of the new DVD/Blu-ray includes new footage or pictures, and the challenge was to make the old SD footage look as good as possible in an HD project.
Subscribe or Unsubscribe



Method Studios Vancouver created 185 shots on White House Down, including CG helicopters, digital doubles, fully digital and extended partial environments with the White House and Capitol Dome, lots of trees; effects included missile trails, explosions, fire, smoke, building destruction, trees blowing and being shredded, ground impact destruction, water interaction. Oh, and they also did some bluescreen comps.

The film's total number of shots was 900 shots; other houses that worked on the film included Uncharted Territory, Prime Focus World, Hybride Technologies, LUXX Studios, Image Engine, Scanline VFX, with additional VFX by Crazy Horse Effects, Trixter, Crafty Apes, Factory VFX, Fuse FX.

In this article, Method VFX supervisor Ollie Rankin, who worked with Method VFX Producer Christopher Anderson, talks to Creative COW about how Method's crew of 80 artists handled some of the movie's most challenging VFX.


CatDV Enhances Production of JPL/NASA Space Exploration Programs.

CatDV Enhances Production of JPL/NASA Space Exploration Programs

CatDV Enhances Production of JPL/NASA Space Exploration Programs

When Explorer 1, built by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), launched into orbit in 1958 successfully marking the United States' first entry into space, America's excitement for space exploration was ignited. For over 50 years, JPL has continued to explore the solar system, other stars and galaxies with robotic spacecraft, amassing huge data files along the way.

JPL's television production facility is tasked with archiving and preserving the historical content of over 50 years of media files from the early days of rocketry and interstellar space exploration. JPL clearly needed a powerful asset management system, and found a powerful tool in CatDV. Image: A Splendor Seldom Seen, courtesy NASA/JPL-Caltech/Space Science Institute, image ID: PIA14934
Subscribe or Unsubscribe



This week, we go behind the lens with Director and Cinematographer Tom Burstyn CSC, FRSA, who is a multi-award winning, Emmy-nominated DP with over 30 years experience. He trained at the National Film Board of Canada as a documentary maker, before turning to the feature film industry. Tom is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Arts and has dual New Zealand/Canadian citizenship. He directed the the Oscar shortlisted documentary This Way of Life as well as the award-winning One Man, One Cow, One Planet, both of which we covered in Creative COW Magazine.

Thomas Burstyn lensed Season One of SyFy's Defiance, currently airing on SyFy in the US and other international outlets, and is in the midst of shooting Season Two. The show is set in a near-future where a variety of extraterrestial races have found their way to a ravaged earth.

He took some time out of his busy schedule to talk with Creative COW about his experiences. The Defiance logo touts "New Earth. New Rules". We've discovered by speaking with Tom that he's defining some new shooting rules of his own - and with blessings from SyFy! Find out more in Behind The Lens: Tom Burstyn Shoots Defiance.


Douglas Trumbull continues to pioneer in the worlds of VFX and Cinematography shooting 120 fps at 4K in 3D.

Douglas Trumbull Pushes New Limits With High Frame Rate Cinema

Douglas Trumbull Pushes New Limits With High Frame Rate Cinema

Douglas Trumbull wanted to make UFOTOG, a 10-minute short, to showcase his vision of immersive movie-going: 120 fps at 4K in 3D, on a curved screen. To shoot and present a movie in a never-before-seen format, he turned to JMR Electronics to design and build a server and storage system that could collect, manage, playback and edit the huge amounts of image data generated by 120 fps, 4K and 3D. In this story, we learn how Trumbull created an innovative pipeline and worked with JMR Electronics to come up with a tailored solution to his very demanding production needs.


Wayne Brinton, visual effects supervisor at Modus FX takes readers behind the scenes of the company's VFX magic in creating 227 visual effects shots for Now You See Me.

Now You See Me: Modus FX Helps Create the Magic

Now You See Me: Modus FX Helps Create the Magic

Modus FX created 227 visual effects shots in Now You See Me, a movie starring Jesse Eisenberg, Mark Ruffalo, Morgan Freeman, Woody Harrelson and Isla Fisher about four young magicians who appear to rob banks during their performances, distributing the spoils to their audiences, while the FBI and Interpol pursue them. Launched in 2007 by co-founders Marc Bourbonnais and Yanick Wilisky, Modus FX is located in a 12,000 square foot facility just outside Montreal.

Modus was charged with many of the film's CG-heavy sequences, including the 5Pointz segment, which was almost entirely CG. In this article Modus FX visual effects supervisor Wayne Brinton takes Creative COW readers behind the scenes of the company's VFX magic.
Subscribe or Unsubscribe
Subscribe or Unsubscribe
Subscribe or Unsubscribe



Shapeshifter in Los Angeles most recently color-corrected and added VFX to ten of the new 15 episodes of the cult TV show Arrested Development. The job came to the full-service post facility almost accidentally, when colorist Randy Coonfield advised the production on how to best round-trip between the company's Avids and its DaVinci Resolve from Blackmagic Design. Since all 15 episodes were released at once, Randy had his hands full, often color-correcting two episodes at a time to make the final push, turning out an entire season in a matter of days.

Here, Randy Coonfield talks to Creative COW about what it took to get this new on-demand season out and streaming.


The Great Gatsby VFX: Animal Logic Sets the Scene in 3D

The Great Gatsby VFX: Animal Logic Sets the Scene in 3D

Award-winning, Sydney-based VFX and animation company, Animal Logic delivered 590 shots for the gilt, luxurious and captivating film adaptation of The Great Gatsby. 175 people worked on Gatsby over the course of a year and a half. VFX Producer Ingrid Johnston and VFX Supervisor Andy Brown talk to Creative COW about their work on The Great Gatsby.


The Great Gatsby VFX: Iloura's Valley of the Ashes

The Great Gatsby VFX: Iloura's Valley of the Ashes

In director Baz Luhrmann's The Great Gatsby, one of the more dramatic locations is the Valley of Ashes, a bleak, depressing rubbish dump that the characters pass through on their way between Manhattan and Long Island. Nearly everything there was created by Iloura, an Australian VFX company. Iloura Visual Effects Supervisor Julian Dimsey and Compositor Matt Ond speak with Creative COW about the work they did to create the Valley of Ashes.


Behind the Lens: The Kings of Summer with Ross Riege

Behind the Lens: The Kings of Summer with Ross Riege

Ross Riege just finished shooting his first feature film, The Kings of Summer. Currently working on a feature-length documentary with director Greg Kohs, Ross took some time out of his busy schedule to talk with Creative COW about his career path as a young cinematographer and his experiences shooting The Kings of Summer.


CatDV Connects with Avid

CatDV Connects with Avid

Square Box Systems' has just unveiled a CatDV asset management system for integration with Avid nonlinear editors. Pegasus is a premium CatDV client that is based on the CatDV Enterprise product and, in addition to integration with Avid Media Composer, also offers metadata support for RED Epic. With this addition, CatDV now offers support for Avid Media Composer, Adobe Premiere and Apple Final Cut Pro.
Subscribe or Unsubscribe



VFX Titans Remember Ray Harryhausen

"When we grieve Ray Harryhausen's passing, we are at least in part grieving perhaps the last living link to the earliest days of movie visual effects," says Creative COW's Debra Kaufman. She spoke to many of today's VFX giants who were inspired by Ray, including Phil Tippett, Richard Edlund, Jeffrey A. Okun and ILM Animation Director Hal Hickel, who says, "Ray Harryhausen's impact on an entire generation (several actually) of filmmakers cannot be overstated, each of them trying again and again to reproduce the wonder they first felt as a child watching Jason fight those skeletons."


Bob Zelin Looks at the Blackmagic Design SmartScope Duo

Bob Zelin Looks at the Blackmagic Design SmartScope Duo

Stop using the high price of HD waveform/vectorscopes as an excuse for not checking your video. Join Bob Zelin for a closer look at a real-world installation of Blackmagic's new SmartScope Duo, a practical, flexible, and yes, affordable approach to broadcast-quality monitoring.


And don't miss the story on a great mentoring program with Biscardi Creative Media and CDAT teacher Mike Reilly.

Creating Animation for PBS - in High School

Creating Animation for PBS - in High School

Lanier High School students work with 3D Studio Max creating a real world project thanks to a collaboration between Biscardi Creative Media Principal Walter Biscardi, Jr. and CDAT teacher Mike Reilly. Instead of just working on a class assignment, these students are creating something that will be part of a PBS documentary due to air in Fall 2013.
Subscribe or Unsubscribe



A jam-packed newsletter this week, so let's dive in!

Iron Man 3, Marvel & The Future of the Superhero

Victoria Alonso, Marvel Studios Executive Vice President of Visual Effects and Post Production, began her career in the early days of the digital visual effects industry. Creative COW's Debra Kaufman had the wonderful opportunity to speak with Victoria about the Iron Man movies, post production's evolution, remote dailies and coloring on set, 4K & HFR, and keeping the modern superhero movie fresh.


FCPX For Broadcast News

Michael Garber has spent hundreds of hours learning the ins and outs of editing broadcast news features with Final Cut Pro X. He describes a workflow that takes advantage of the best that FCPX's new approaches have to offer, while being honest about its limitations. Every editor already working with FCPX, or still just considering it, will benefit from Michael's experience.


Review: GenArts Releases Sapphire 7

Frequent COW Contributing Editor Kevin P. McAuliffe reviews the latest version of GenArts Sapphire plug-in effects filters for both Adobe After Effects and Avid AVX versions, with ratings for current and new Sapphire users. Kevin also observes Sapphire's ability to plug into other NLEs and finishing systems, and takes a closer look at its licensing options, including purchasing, monthly rental and site licenses. You'll definitely want to see the latest and greatest of what this must-have software package has to offer.

And if you're looking to raise your game with Avid Media Composer and Avid Symphony, Kevin McAuliffe is your man, with more Avid tutorials than you'll find anywhere else on the web. Here's the index page to get started.

Subscribe or Unsubscribe



With the second biggest opening weekend in US history, and $300 million worldwide box office in its first eight days, it's clear that Iron Man 3 is off to a roaring start with audience. Readers of Creative COW know that some of the best stories actually come from the artists behind the scenes. Offered here are tales and insights from Alessandro Cioffi, VFX Supervisor for Trixter. Seventy artists from Trixter worked an entire year to create a formidable 208 VFX shots for Marvel's Iron Man 3. Each new episode in the Iron Man saga details a slick new technology created by the ingenious Tony Stark, and the new installment does not disappoint! Combining the hard surface geometry of the Iron Man suit auto-assembly with the flexibility of the human body was one of the challenges that Trixter brought from previs to believable screen reality.

Trixter's very first task was to create Iron Man 3's opening sequence. Trixter VFX Supervisor Alessandro Cioffi adds the punchline: "This very sequence was selected by Marvel to be shown at Comic-Con, and we had eight weeks to do it. In addition to the short turn-around, another problem was that all we had in our hands was the main suit design -- that was it. At the start, we didn't even have a model for the suit. Oh, and principal photography hadn't started yet either." In the end, they had 30 shots to turn around in this narrow window.

Trixter worked on two key sequences in particular. One of them is among Iron Man's most distinctive ingredients: Tony Stark's Iron Man suit's assembly. This third movie in the series made things considerably more difficult because, unlike previously, actor Robert Downey, Jr. was in motion the entire time. "We had to perfectly match-move his body to make it look real," says Alessandro. "We shot passes in the studio to see what happens if someone is moving that frantically. A human body is very flexible, whereas the suit is rigid, a hard surface geometry. We had to think how to combine these two things." Alessandro refers to the second major sequence that Trixter worked on as "The Glove and Boot Fight," but we'll let him fill you in on the details on this, and the rest of Trixter's work on Iron Man 3.




We'll also draw your attention to Creative COW Contributing Editor and industry leader Walter Biscardi's first look at Adobe Premiere Pro NEXT Top Ten!
Subscribe or Unsubscribe
1   •   2   •   3   •   4   •   5   •   6   •   7   •   8   •   9   •   10   •   11   •   12   •   13   •   14   •   15   •   16   •   17   •   18   •   19   •   20   •   21   •   22   •   23   •   24   •   25   •   26   •   27   •   28   •   29   •   30   •   31   •   32   •   33   •   34   •   35


FORUMSTUTORIALSFEATURESVIDEOSPODCASTSEVENTSSERVICESNEWSLETTERNEWSBLOGS

Creative COW LinkedIn Group Creative COW Facebook Page Creative COW on Twitter
© 2014 CreativeCOW.net All rights are reserved. - Privacy Policy

[Top]